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A New Forum on Pope Francis

Discussion in 'Pope Francis' started by padraig, May 8, 2013.

  1. Glenn

    Glenn Guest

  2. Marie-Lou

    Marie-Lou Angels

    Happy Birthday Pope Francis. Wishing you a blessed, peaceful year ahead :)
     
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  3. Glenn

    Glenn Guest

    Pope tells Roman Curia to "return to the essentials"

    2015-12-21 Vatican Radio

    [​IMG]
    (Vatican Radio) Pope Francis has urged the Roman Curia to “return to the essentials” and follow a path of gratitude, conversion, renewal, penance and reconciliation as indicated by the Year of Mercy.

    The Pope was addressing members of the Curia gathered in the Vatican Clementine Hall for the annual Christmas Greetings.

    Listen to the report by Linda Bordoni: [​IMG]

    Recalling briefly this same occasion last year during which he made a long list of curial diseases that adversely affect and infect the Church, Pope Francis said that some of those “diseases became evident in the course of the past year, causing no small pain to the entire body and harming many souls”.

    Reiterating his determination to move forward with ecclesial reform – which is necessary, he said, to allow us to “advance on the path of goodness” - he recited another long list: a “catalogue of needed virtues” – a practical aid – he explained - for those who serve in the Curia and would like to make their consecration or service to the Church more fruitful”.

    The first of the 12 virtues listed by Pope Francis is that of a “Missionary and pastoral spirit” which is what – he said - makes the Curia fertile and fruitful, and is what is needed by priests in their daily effort to follow the Good Shepherd who cares for the flock and gives his life to save the lives of others.

    He goes on to name “Suitability and sagacity” which are also needed for staying away from “recommendations” and payoffs and for putting oneself into God’s hands.

    Then come “Spirituality and humanity”, “Example and fidelity” which he said – reminds the Curia of its calling to set an example - an example of avoiding scandals which harm souls and impair the credibility of our witness.

    “Rationality and gentleness”, “Innocuousness and determination”, “Charity and truth”, “Honesty and maturity”, “Respectfulness and humility”, “Diligence and attentiveness”, “Intrepidness and alertness” followed en suite, each of them accompanied by gentle words of wisdom and explanation.
    And finally: “Trustworthiness and sobriety” – the last – the Pope said - but not the least of the virtues on this list. Sobriety gives us the ability to renounce what is superfluous and to resist the dominant consumerist mentality, to be simple, balanced and temperate, to see the world through God’s eyes.

    “And so – Pope Francis concluded - may mercy guide our steps, inspire our reforms and enlighten our decisions. May it be the basis of all our efforts. Quoting from a prayer first pronounced by Cardinal John Dearden he reminded his brothers that “we are prophets of a future that does not belong to us”.
     
  4. Glenn

    Glenn Guest

    Pope delivers Christmas Urbi et Orbi message

    2015-12-25 Vatican Radio

    [​IMG]

    Pope Francis this Christmas day delivered his Urbi et Orbi message, (to the city and the world) from the central loggia of St Peter's Basilica. In it he prayed that recent U.N.-backed peace agreements for Syria and Libya would quickly end the suffering of their people.

    He also spoke about the ``brutal acts of terrorism'' that struck the French capital this year as well as conflicts in Africa, the Mideast and Ukraine.

    Below is the English translation of the Pope's message

    Message of His Holiness Pope Francis

    Urbi et Orbi

    25 December 2015

    Dear brothers and sisters, Happy Christmas!

    Christ is born for us, let us rejoice in the day of our salvation!

    Let us open our hearts to receive the grace of this day, which is Christ himself. Jesus is the radiant “day” which has dawned on the horizon of humanity. A day of mercy, in which God our Father has revealed his great tenderness to the entire world. A day of light, which dispels the darkness of fear and anxiety. A day of peace, which makes for encounter, dialogue and reconciliation. A day of joy: a “great joy” for the poor, the lowly and for all the people (cf. Lk 2:10).

    On this day, Jesus, the Saviour is born of the Virgin Mary. The Crib makes us see the “sign” which God has given us: “a baby wrapped in swaddling cloths and lying in a manger” (Lk 2:12). Like the shepherds of Bethlehem, may we too set out to see this sign, this event which is renewed yearly in the Church. Christmas is an event which is renewed in every family, parish and community which receives the love of God made incarnate in Jesus Christ. Like Mary, the Church shows to everyone the “sign” of God: the Child whom she bore in her womb and to whom she gave birth, yet who is the Son of the Most High, since he “is of the Holy Spirit” (Mt 1:20). He is truly the Saviour, for he is the Lamb of God who takes upon himself the sin of the world (cf. Jn 1:29). With the shepherds, let us bow down before the Lamb, let us worship God’s goodness made flesh, and let us allow tears of repentance to fill our eyes and cleanse our hearts.

    He alone, he alone can save us. Only God’s mercy can free humanity from the many forms of evil, at times monstrous evil, which selfishness spawns in our midst. The grace of God can convert hearts and offer mankind a way out of humanly insoluble situations.

    Where God is born, hope is born. Where God is born, peace is born. And where peace is born, there is no longer room for hatred and for war. Yet precisely where the incarnate Son of God came into the world, tensions and violence persist, and peace remains a gift to be implored and built. May Israelis and Palestinians resume direct dialogue and reach an agreement which will enable the two peoples to live together in harmony, ending a conflict which has long set them at odds, with grave repercussions for the entire region.

    We pray to the Lord that the agreement reached in the United Nations may succeed in halting as quickly as possible the clash of arms in Syria and in remedying the extremely grave humanitarian situation of its suffering people. It is likewise urgent that the agreement on Libya be supported by all, so as to overcome the grave divisions and violence afflicting the country. May the attention of the international community be unanimously directed to ending the atrocities which in those countries, as well as in Iraq, Libya, Yemen and sub-Saharan Africa, even now reap numerous victims, cause immense suffering and do not even spare the historical and cultural patrimony of entire peoples. My thoughts also turn to those affected by brutal acts of terrorism, particularly the recent massacres which took place in Egyptian airspace, in Beirut, Paris, Bamako and Tunis.

    To our brothers and sisters who in many parts of the world are being persecuted for their faith, may the Child Jesus grant consolation and strength.

    We also pray for peace and concord among the peoples of the Democratic Republic of Congo, Burundi and South Sudan, that dialogue may lead to a strengthened common commitment to the building of civil societies animated by a sincere spirit of reconciliation and of mutual understanding.

    May Christmas also bring true peace to Ukraine, offer comfort to those suffering from the effects of the conflict, and inspire willingess to carry out the agreements made to restore concord in the entire country.

    May the joy of this day illumine the efforts of the Colombian people so that, inspired by hope, they may continue their commitment to working for the desired peace.

    Where God is born, hope is born; and where hope is born, persons regain their dignity. Yet even today great numbers of men and woman are deprived of their human dignity and, like the child Jesus, suffer cold, poverty, and rejection. May our closeness today be felt by those who are most vulnerable, especially child soldiers, women who suffer violence, and the victims of human trafficking and the drug trade.

    Nor may our encouragement be lacking to all those fleeing extreme poverty or war, travelling all too often in inhumane conditions and not infrequently at the risk of their lives. May God repay all those, both individuals and states, who generously work to provide assistance and welcome to the numerous migrants and refugees, helping them to build a dignified future for themselves and for their dear ones, and to be integrated in the societies which receive them.

    On this festal day may the Lord grant renewed hope to all those who lack employment; may he sustain the commitment of those with public responsibilities in political and economic life, that they may work to pursue the common good and to protect the dignity of every human life.

    Where God is born, mercy flourishes. Mercy is the most precious gift which God gives us, especially during this Jubilee year in which we are called to discover that tender love of our heavenly Father for each of us. May the Lord enable prisoners in particular to experience his merciful love, which heals wounds and triumphs over evil.

    Today, then, let us together rejoice in the day of our salvation. As we contemplate the Crib, let us gaze on the open arms of Jesus, which show us the merciful embrace of God, as we hear the cries of the Child who whispers to us: “for my brethren and companions’ sake, I will say: Peace be within you” (Ps 121[122]:8).
     
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  5. Glenn

    Glenn Guest

    Pope Francis opens Holy Door at St Mary Major

    2016-01-01 Vatican Radio

    [​IMG]
    (Vatican Radio) Pope Francis on Friday evening celebrated Mass and opened the Holy Door at the papal Basilica of St Mary Major.

    Listen to Christopher Wells' report:

    [​IMG]

    The Basilica of St Mary Major, also known as Our Lady of the Snows, is one of the oldest churches dedicated to the Mother of God, and the largest in the world. So it was particularly appropriate that the Pope chose the Solemnity of Mary the Mother of God to open the Holy Door at one of Rome’s most beloved churches.

    Earlier, on the feast of the Immaculate Conception, the Holy Father solemnly opened the Holy Door at St Peter’s basilica to inaugurate the Jubilee Year of Mercy; a few days later, he presided at the opening of the Holy Door at Rome’s Cathedral, the Archbasilica of St John Lateran. The Holy Door at St Paul’s “Outside-the-Walls” was opened by the Archpriest of that Basilica, Cardinal James Harvey.

    Since the Jubilee Year of 1500, Holy Doors have been opened at all four of the Major Basilicas in Rome. For the Jubilee of Mercy, Pope Francis has also opened a Holy Door at a homeless shelter at Rome’s central train station, and, during his trip to the Central African Republic, the Holy Door at the Cathedral in Bangui, the nation’s capital. The Holy Father has also extended permission to Bishops around the world to open Holy Doors in their own Diocese. Those passing through a Holy Door, whether in Rome or elsewhere throughout the world, are able to obtain a plenary indulgence, under the usual conditions. In his Bull Misericordiae Vultus, formally proclaiming the Jubilee Year of Mercy, Pope Francis said, “the Holy Door will become a Door of Mercy through which anyone who enters will experience the love of God who consoles, pardons, and instils hope.”

    Below, please find the official translation of the prepared text for Pope Francis’ homily at the Papal Basilica of Saint Mary Major:

    Homily of Pope Francis
    Solemnity of Mary the Mother of God
    and the Opening of the Holy Door at the Basilica of St Mary Major


    1 January 2016

    Salve, Mater Misericordiae!

    With this invocation we turn to the Blessed Virgin Mary in the Roman Basilica dedicated to her under the title of Mother of God. It is the first line of an ancient hymn which we will sing at the conclusion of this Holy Eucharist. Composed by an unknown author, it has come down to us as a heartfelt prayer spontaneously rising up from the hearts of the faithful: “Hail Mother of mercy, Mother of God, Mother of forgiveness, Mother of hope, Mother of grace and Mother full of holy gladness”. In these few words we find a summary of the faith of generations of men and women who, with their eyes fixed firmly on the icon of the Blessed Virgin, have sought her intercession and consolation.

    It is most fitting that on this day we invoke the Blessed Virgin Mary above all as Mother of mercy. The door we have opened is, in fact, a Door of Mercy. Those who cross its threshold are called to enter into the merciful love of the Father with complete trust and freedom from fear; they can leave this Basilica knowing that Mary is ever at their side. She is the Mother of mercy, because she bore in her womb the very Face of divine mercy, Jesus, Emmanuel, the Expectation of the nations, the “Prince of Peace” (Is 9:5). The Son of God, made incarnate for our salvation, has given us his Mother, who joins us on our pilgrimage through this life, so that we may never be left alone, especially at times of trouble and uncertainty.

    Mary is the Mother of God who forgives, who bestows forgiveness, and so we can rightly call her Mother of forgiveness. This word – “forgiveness” – so misunderstood in today’s world, points to the new and original fruit of Christian faith. A person unable to forgive has not yet known the fullness of love. Only one who truly loves is able to forgive and forget. At the foot of the Cross, Mary sees her Son offer himself totally, showing us what it means to love as God loves. At that moment she heard Jesus utter words which probably reflected what he had learned from her as a child: “Father, forgive them; for they do not know what they are doing” (Lk 23:24). At that moment, Mary became for all of us the Mother of forgiveness. Following Jesus’ example and by his grace, she herself could forgive those who killed her innocent Son.

    For us, Mary is an icon of how the Church must offer forgiveness to those who seek it. The Mother of forgiveness teaches the Church that the forgiveness granted on Golgotha knows no limits. Neither the law with its quibbles, nor the wisdom of this world with its distinctions, can hold it back. The Church’s forgiveness must be every bit as broad as that offered by Jesus on the Cross and by Mary at his feet. There is no other way. It is for this purpose that the Holy Spirit made the Apostles the effective ministers of forgiveness, so what was obtained by the death of Jesus may reach all men and women in every age (cf. Jn 20:19-23).

    The Marian hymn continues: “Mother of hope and Mother of grace, Mother of holy gladness”. Hope, grace and holy gladness are all sisters: they are the gift of Christ; indeed, they are so many names written on his body. The gift that Mary bestows in offering us Jesus is the forgiveness which renews life, enables us once more to do God’s will and fills us with true happiness. This grace frees the heart to look to the future with the joy born of hope. This is the teaching of the Psalm: “Create in me a clean heart, O God, and put a new and right spirit within me. […] Restore to me the joy of your salvation” (51:10,12). The power of forgiveness is the true antidote to the sadness caused by resentment and vengeance. Forgiveness leads to joy and serenity because it frees the heart from thoughts of death, whereas resentment and vengeance trouble the mind and wound the heart, robbing it of rest and peace.

    Let us, then, pass through the Holy Door of Mercy knowing that at our side is the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Holy Mother of God, who intercedes for us. Let us allow her to lead us to the rediscovery of the beauty of an encounter with her Son Jesus. Let us open wide the doors of our heart to the joy of forgiveness, conscious that we have been given new confidence and hope, and thus make our daily lives a humble instrument of God’s love.

    And with the love and affection of children, let us cry out to Our Lady as did the faithful people of God in Ephesus during the historic Council: “Holy Mother of God!”

    (from Vatican Radio)
     
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  6. Glenn

    Glenn Guest

    Pope Francis: homily for Mass on Feast of Mother of God

    2016-01-01 Vatican Radio

    [​IMG]

    Pope Francis delivered the homily at Mass on New Year's Day, the Solemnity of the Mother of God, in St. Peter's Basilica. Below, please find the full text of the official English translation of his prepared remarks.

    ******************************************

    Salve, Mater Misericordiae!

    With this invocation we turn to the Blessed Virgin Mary in the Roman Basilica dedicated to her under the title of Mother of God. It is the first line of an ancient hymn which we will sing at the conclusion of this Holy Eucharist. Composed by an unknown author, it has come down to us as a heartfelt prayer spontaneously rising up from the hearts of the faithful: “Hail Mother of mercy, Mother of God, Mother of forgiveness, Mother of hope, Mother of grace and Mother full of holy gladness”. In these few words we find a summary of the faith of generations of men and women who, with their eyes fixed firmly on the icon of the Blessed Virgin, have sought her intercession and consolation.

    It is most fitting that on this day we invoke the Blessed Virgin Mary above all as Mother of mercy. The door we have opened is, in fact, a Door of Mercy. Those who cross its threshold are called to enter into the merciful love of the Father with complete trust and freedom from fear; they can leave this Basilica knowing that Mary is ever at their side. She is the Mother of mercy, because she bore in her womb the very Face of divine mercy, Jesus, Emmanuel, the Expectation of the nations, the “Prince of Peace” (Is 9:5). The Son of God, made incarnate for our salvation, has given us his Mother, who joins us on our pilgrimage through this life, so that we may never be left alone, especially at times of trouble and uncertainty.

    Mary is the Mother of God who forgives, who bestows forgiveness, and so we can rightly call her Mother of forgiveness. This word – “forgiveness” – so misunderstood in today’s world, points to the new and original fruit of Christian faith. A person unable to forgive has not yet known the fullness of love. Only one who truly loves is able to forgive and forget. At the foot of the Cross, Mary sees her Son offer himself totally, showing us what it means to love as God loves. At that moment she heard Jesus utter words which probably reflected what he had learned from her as a child: “Father, forgive them; for they do not know what they are doing” (Lk 23:24). At that moment, Mary became for all of us the Mother of forgiveness. Following Jesus’ example and by his grace, she herself could forgive those who killed her innocent Son.

    For us, Mary is an icon of how the Church must offer forgiveness to those who seek it. The Mother of forgiveness teaches the Church that the forgiveness granted on Golgotha knows no limits. Neither the law with its quibbles, nor the wisdom of this world with its distinctions, can hold it back. The Church’s forgiveness must be every bit as broad as that offered by Jesus on the Cross and by Mary at his feet. There is no other way. It is for this purpose that the Holy Spirit made the Apostles the effective ministers of forgiveness, so what was obtained by the death of Jesus may reach all men and women in every age (cf. Jn 20:19-23).

    The Marian hymn continues: “Mother of hope and Mother of grace, Mother of holy gladness”. Hope, grace and holy gladness are all sisters: they are the gift of Christ; indeed, they are so many names written on his body. The gift that Mary bestows in offering us Jesus is the forgiveness which renews life, enables us once more to do God’s will and fills us with true happiness. This grace frees the heart to look to the future with the joy born of hope. This is the teaching of the Psalm: “Create in me a clean heart, O God, and put a new and right spirit within me. […] Restore to me the joy of your salvation” (51:10,12). The power of forgiveness is the true antidote to the sadness caused by resentment and vengeance. Forgiveness leads to joy and serenity because it frees the heart from thoughts of death, whereas resentment and vengeance trouble the mind and wound the heart, robbing it of rest and peace.

    Let us, then, pass through the Holy Door of Mercy knowing that at our side is the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Holy Mother of God, who intercedes for us. Let us allow her to lead us to the rediscovery of the beauty of an encounter with her Son Jesus. Let us open wide the doors of our heart to the joy of forgiveness, conscious that we have been given new confidence and hope, and thus make our daily lives a humble instrument of God’s love.

    And with the love and affection of children, let us cry out to Our Lady as did the faithful people of God in Ephesus during the historic Council: “Holy Mother of God!”

    Share
    [​IMG]
     
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  7. Glenn

    Glenn Guest

    This innovative “video of the Pope” is causing a sensation
    2016-01-06
    7.6K?2?[​IMG]




    (ONLY VIDEO) Traditionally, Christians pray for the Pope's intentions that are publish on a monthly basis. However, from now on, Pope Francis will be announcing these intentions in a spot like this. The aim is to increase His outreach in a more modern and powerful way.

    The project is an initiative of La Red Mundial de Oración del Papa and was conducted by La Machi Communications agency in collaboration with ROME REPORTS and the Vatican Television Center.

    http://www.romereports.com/2016/01/...ope-is-causing-a-sensation?platform=hootsuite
     
  8. Glenn

    Glenn Guest

    ‘The Name of God is Mercy’: new book by Pope Francis

    2016-01-11 Vatican Radio

    [​IMG]
    (Vatican Radio) “The Name of God is Mercy” is the title of a new book set to be released in 86 countries on Tuesday (12 Jan), in which Pope Francis reveals his vision of God’s mercy in a series of interviews with Vatican reporter Andrea Tornielli.

    Several extracts were made available by the publisher,Piemme, ahead of its official release.

    The pope, like Peter, is in need of mercy

    “The Pope is a man who needs the mercy of God,” the Holy Father says in the book-length interview.

    “I said it sincerely to the prisoners of Palmasola, in Bolivia, to those men and women who welcomed me so warmly. I reminded them that even Saint Peter and Saint Paul had been prisoners. I have a special relationship with people in prisons, deprived of their freedom. I have always been very attached to them, precisely because of my awareness of being a sinner.”

    “Every time I go through the gates into a prison to celebrate Mass or for a visit, I always think: why them and not me? I should be here. I deserve to be here. Their fall could have been mine. I do not feel superior to the people who stand before me. And so I repeat and pray: why him and not me? It might seem shocking, but I derive consolation from Peter: he betrayed Jesus, and even so he was chosen.”

    Pope John Paul I: ‘engraved in dust’

    The Holy Father also remembers being touched by the writings of his predecessor Pope John Paul I, Albino Luciani. “There is the homily when Albino Luciani said he had been chosen because the Lord preferred that certain things not be engraved in bronze or marble but in the dust, so that if the writing had remained, it would have been clear that the merit was all and only God’s. He, the bishop and future Pope John Paul I, called himself ‘dust’.”

    “I have to say that when I speak of this, I always think of what Peter told Jesus on the Sunday of his resurrection, when he met him on his own, a meeting hinted at in the Gospel of Luke. What might Peter have said to the Messiah upon his resurrection from the tomb? Might he have said that he felt like a sinner? He must have thought of his betrayal, of what had happened a few days earlier when he pretended three times not to recognise Jesus in the courtyard of the High Priest’s house. He must have thought of his bitter and public tears.”

    “If Peter did all of that, if the gospels describe his sin and denials to us, and if despite all this Jesus said [to him], ‘tend my sheep’ (John 21), I don’t think we should be surprised if his successors describe themselves as sinners. It is nothing new.”

    Miserando atque eligendo

    Telling the story of his episcopal motto, Pope Francis returns to an experience of God’s mercy, which took place in his teenage years.

    “I don’t have any particular memories of mercy as a young child. But I do as a young man. I think of Father Carlos Duarte Ibarra, the confessor I met in my parish church on September 21, 1953, the day the Church celebrated Saint Matthew, the apostle and evangelist. I was seventeen years old. On confessing myself to him, I felt welcomed by the mercy of God.”

    “Ibarra was originally from Corrientes but was in Buenos Aires to receive treatment for leukaemia. He died the following year. I still remember how when I got home, after his funeral and burial, I felt as though I had been abandoned. And I cried a lot that night, really a lot, and hid in my room.”

    “Why? Because I had lost a person who helped me feel the mercy of God, that miserando atque eligendo, an expression I didn’t know at the time but I eventually would choose as my episcopal motto. I learned about it later, in the homilies of the English monk, the Venerable Bede [672-735]. When describing the calling of Matthew, he writes: “Jesus saw the tax collector and by having mercy chose him as an apostle saying to him, ‘follow me’.”

    “This is the translation commonly given for the words of Saint Bede [originally written in Latin]. I like to translate “miserando” with another gerund that doesn’t exist: misericordando ormercying. So, “mercying him and choosing him” describes the vision of Jesus who gives the gift of mercy and chooses, and takes with him.”

    Church condemns sin, shows mercy to sinner

    “The Church condemns sin because it has to relay the truth: ‘this is a sin’. But at the same time, it embraces the sinner who recognises himself as such, it welcomes him, it speaks to him of the infinite mercy of God. Jesus forgave even those who crucified and scorned him.”

    “To follow the way of the Lord, the Church is called on to dispense its mercy over all those who recognise themselves as sinners, who assume responsibility for the evil they have committed, and who feel in need of forgiveness. The Church does not exist to condemn people, but to bring about an encounter with the visceral love of God’s mercy.”

    “I often say that in order for this to happen, it is necessary to go out: to go out from the churches and the parishes, to go outside and look for people where they live, where they suffer, and where they hope. I like to use the image of a field hospital to describe this “Church that goes forth”. It exists where there is combat. It is not a solid structure with all the equipment where people go to receive treatment for both small and large infirmities. It is a mobile structure that offers first aid and immediate care, so that its soldiers do not die.”

    “It is a place for urgent care, not a place to see a specialist. I hope that the Jubilee [The Holy Year of Mercy] will serve to reveal the Church’s deeply maternal and merciful side, a Church that goes forth toward those who are “wounded,” who are in need of an attentive ear, understanding, forgiveness, and love.”

    Mercy yes, corruption no

    Pope Francis goes on to point out the difference between sin and corruption, saying the corrupt man lacks the humility to recognise his sins.

    “Corruption is the sin which, rather than being recognised as such and rendering us humble, is elevated to a system; it becomes a mental habit, a way of living. We no longer feel the need for forgiveness and mercy, but we justify ourselves and our behaviours.”

    “Jesus says to his disciples: even if your brother offends you seven times a day, and seven times a day he returns to you to ask for forgiveness, forgive him. The repentant sinner, who sins again and again because of his weakness, will find forgiveness if he acknowledges his need for mercy. The corrupt man is the one who sins but does not repent, who sins and pretends to be Christian, and it is this double life that is scandalous.”

    “The corrupt man does not know humility, he does not consider himself in need of help, he leads a double life. We must not accept the state of corruption as if it were just another sin. Even though corruption is often identified with sin, in fact they are two distinct realities, albeit interconnected.”

    “Sin, especially if repeated, can lead to corruption, not quantitatively — in the sense that a certain number of sins makes a person corrupt — but rather qualitatively: habits are formed that limit one’s capacity for love and create a false sense of self-sufficiency.”

    “The corrupt man tires of asking for forgiveness and ends up believing that he doesn’t need to ask for it any more. We don’t become corrupt people overnight. It is a long, slippery slope that cannot be identified simply as a series of sins. One may be a great sinner and never fall into corruption if hearts feel their own weakness. That small opening allows the strength of God to enter.”

    “When a sinner recognises himself as such, he admits in some way that what he was attached to, or clings to, is false. The corrupt man hides what he considers his true treasure, but which really makes him a slave and masks his vice with good manners, always managing to keep up appearances.”

    (from Vatican Radio)
     
  9. Glenn

    Glenn Guest

    Pope Francis: "the prayers of the faithful work miracles"

    2016-01-12 Vatican Radio

    [​IMG]
    (Vatican Radio) Pope Francis says prayer works miracles and prevents the hardening of the heart.

    His words came on Tuesday morning during morning Mass at the Casa Santa Marta.

    “It’s the prayer of the faithful – the Pope said – that brings change to the Church; it’s not us popes, bishops or priests who carry the Church forward, but the Saints”.

    Pope Francis took his cue from the Bible reading of the day which tells the story of Hannah, a woman whom, deeply distressed by her infertility, desperately prays to the Lord to give her a child, and of Eli, a priest, who looks on vaguely from afar and superficially judges the woman as a drunkard as he can see her babbling but cannot hear her words.

    “Hannah was praying silently, her lips moved but her voice was not heard. Hers is the courage of a woman of faith who is weeping and grieving and asks the Lord for his grace. There are many good women in the Church, many! They place all their trust in prayer... Let us think of one of them, Saint Monica who was able, with her tears, to be granted the grace of conversion for her son, Saint Augustine. There are so many” the Pope said.

    Eli, the priest, is “a poor man” towards whom, Francis says, he feels “a certain sympathy” because – he explains - “I find faults in myself that allow me to understand him well and feel close to him.” “How easily - the Pope continues – do we judge people and lack the respect to say: 'I wonder what he has in his heart? I do not know, but I will say nothing...’ When the heart lacks compassion one always thinks evil" and does not understand those who pray “with pain and anguish” and “entrust that pain and anguish to the Lord”.

    “Jesus knows this kind of prayer. When he was in Gethsemane and was so anguished and hurt he sweated blood, He did not accuse the Father: ‘Father, if You are willing, remove this cup from me; yet not my will, but Yours be done’”. Jesus responded in the same way of the woman: with meekness. Sometimes, we pray, we ask things of God, but often we do not know how to engage with the Lord, to ask for grace” he said.

    The Pope also recalled the story of a man in Buenos Aires whose 9-year-old-daughter was dying in hospital. He said he spent the night at the shrine of the Virgin of Luján clinging to the gate and praying for the grace of healing. The next morning, when he returned to the hospital, his daughter was healed:

    “Prayer works miracles; it works miracles for Christians, whether they be faithful laypeople, priests, bishops who have lost compassion. The prayers of the faithful change the Church: it’s not us popes, bishops, priests or nuns who carry the Church forward, but Saints. Saints are those who dare to believe that God is the Lord and that He can do everything” Pope Francis concluded.

    (from Vatican Radio)
     
  10. Glenn

    Glenn Guest

    Pope Francis to travel to Sweden for joint Reformation commemoration

    2016-01-25 Vatican Radio

    [​IMG]
    (Vatican Radio) Pope Francis will travel to Sweden in October for a joint ecumenical commemoration of the start of the Reformation, together with leaders of the Lutheran World Federation and representatives of other Christian Churches.

    The event will take place on October 31st in the southern Swedish city of Lund where the Lutheran World Federation was founded in 1947. While kicking off a year of events to mark the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation, it will also highlight the important ecumenical developments that have taken place during the past 50 years of dialogue between Catholics and Lutherans.

    The one-day event will include a common worship service in Lund cathedral based on a Catholic-Lutheran “Common Prayer” liturgical guide, published earlier this month by the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity (PCPCU) and the Lutheran World Federation (LWF).

    The commemoration in Lund follows on directly from the publication in 2013 of a joint document entitled ‘From Conflict to Communion’, which focuses on the themes of thanksgiving, repentance and commitment to common witness. While asking for forgiveness for the divisions of past centuries, it also seeks to showcase the gifts of the Reformation and celebrate the way Catholics and Lutherans around the world work together on issues of common concern.

    Please see below the joint press release from the LWF and the PCPCU on the joint ecumenical commemoration of the Reformation in Lund

    Pope Francis, LWF President Bishop Younan and General Secretary Junge to lead October event

    GENEVA/VATICAN CITY, 25 January 2016 - The Lutheran World Federation (LWF) and the Catholic Church will hold a joint ecumenical commemoration of the Reformation on 31 October 2016 in Lund, Sweden.

    Pope Francis, LWF President Bishop Dr Munib A. Younan and General Secretary Rev. Dr Martin Junge will lead the Ecumenical Commemoration in cooperation with the Church of Sweden and the Catholic Diocese of Stockholm.

    The joint ecumenical event will take place in the city of Lund in anticipation of the 500th Reformation anniversary in 2017. It will highlight the solid ecumenical developments between Catholics and Lutherans and the joint gifts received through dialogue. The event will include a common worship based on the recently published Catholic-Lutheran “Common Prayer” liturgical guide.

    “The LWF is approaching the Reformation anniversary in a spirit of ecumenical accountability,” says LWF General Secretary Rev. Dr Martin Junge. “I’m carried by the profound conviction that by working towards reconciliation between Lutherans and Catholics, we are working towards justice, peace and reconciliation in a world torn apart by conflict and violence.”

    Cardinal Koch, President of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity (PCPCU) explains further: “By concentrating together on the centrality of the question of God and on a Christocentric approach, Lutherans and Catholics will have the possibility of an ecumenical commemoration of the Reformation, not simply in a pragmatic way, but in the deep sense of faith in the crucified and resurrected Christ.

    “It is with joy and expectation that the Church of Sweden welcomes The Lutheran World Federation and the Catholic Church to hold the joint commemoration of the Reformation in Lund,” says Church of Sweden Archbishop Antje Jackelén. “We shall pray together with the entire ecumenical family in Sweden that the commemoration will contribute to Christian unity in our country and throughout the world.”

    “The ecumenical situation in our part of the world is unique and interesting. I hope that this meeting will help us look to the future so that we can be witnesses of Jesus Christ and His gospel in our secularized world,” says Anders Arborelius OCD, Bishop of the Catholic Church in Sweden.

    The Lund event is part of the reception process of the study document From Conflict to Communion, which was published in 2013, and has since been widely distributed to Lutheran and Catholic communities. The document is the first attempt by both dialogue partners to describe together at international level the history of the Reformation and its intentions.

    Earlier this year, the LWF and PCPCU sent to LWF member churches and Catholic Bishops’ Conferences a jointly prepared “Common Prayer”, which is a liturgical guide to help churches commemorate the Reformation anniversary together. It is based on the study document From Conflict to Communion: Lutheran-Catholic Common Commemoration of the Reformation in 2017, and features the themes of thanksgiving, repentance and commitment to common witness with the aim of expressing the gifts of the Reformation and asking forgiveness for the division which followed theological disputes.

    The year 2017 will also mark 50 years of the international Lutheran-Catholic dialogue, which has yielded notable ecumenical results, of which most significant is the Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification (JDDJ). The JDDJ was signed by the LWF and the Catholic Church in 1999, and affirmed by the World Methodist Council in 2006. The declaration nullified centuries’ old disputes between Catholics and Lutherans over the basic truths of the doctrine of justification, which was at the center of the 16th century Reformation.

    (from Vatican Radio)
     
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  11. Glenn

    Glenn Guest

    General Audience: God of Mercy is not indifferent

    2016-01-27 Vatican Radio

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    (Vatican Radio) Pope Francis on Wednesday spoke about God’s mercy throughout history, and in our own day.

    Listen to Christopher Wells' report:

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    In his weekly General Audience, Pope Francis noted that the Lord always accompanied the people of Israel, and showed how God continues to work in our own time as well.

    He pointed to the story of Joseph and his brothers as an example of grace and reconciliation, and said the Jubilee Year of Mercy was a good opportunity to reconcile with family members.

    The example of Moses, who led the Israelites from slavery to freedom, shows that “mercy cannot remain indifferent in the face of the suffering of the oppressed, the cry of those subject to violence, reduced to slavery, condemned to death.” Suffering is a reality in every age, a reality that can make us feel impotent, and tempt us to indifference. But, Pope Francis said, “God is not indifferent, He never looks away from human suffering.” The God of mercy hears the groaning of the poor and intervenes to save them, especially by “raising up men and women able to hear the cries of the suffering, and working in favour of the oppressed.”

    As Moses was God’s instrument leading the people of Israel to freedom, we too, especially in this Year of Mercy, can be mediators of God’s mercy. “There are so many good things we can do!” the Pope said.

    Turning again to the history of the people of Israel, Pope Francis spoke of how God made a covenant with the people, creating a special, privileged relationship with them. This special relationship, brought to fulfilment through the Blood of Christ, “destroys our sin through forgiveness, and makes us definitively children of God.” Pope Francis concluded his address with the hope that, in this Year of Mercy, we too, precisely because of the mercy God has shown us, might cooperate with God in accomplishing works of mercy.

    (from Vatican Radio)
     
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  12. Glenn

    Glenn Guest

    Pope Francis: May warring siblings forgive each other during the Year of Mercy
    2016-01-27

    The weekly general audience has returned to St. Peter's Square, where thousands of pilgrims can show their affection for Pope Francis. He returned to his catechesis on mercy with a message for families who may be fighting amongst themselves.

    POPE FRANCIS
    "I think of the many siblings that have become estranged from family and do not speak. And this Year of Mercy is a good opportunity for them to reconnect, embrace, and forgive each other. To forget the bad things.”

    Recalling the story of Moses, who saved the Jewish people from slavery in Egypt, the Pope explained that God is not indifferent to the suffering of mankind.

    POPE FRANCIS
    "The mercy of God is not indifferent to the pain of the downtrodden, the cry of whose tho suffer violence, slavery, or are condemned to death. It makes us feel impotent and tempts us to harden our hearts. God, in turn, 'is not indifferent,' he does not abandon, but instead acts and saves.”

    The Pope insisted that God loves every person in a special and privileged way. He encouraged people to discover that reality.

    The audience ended on a colorful note, thanks to these circus performers.

    POPE FRANCIS
    "I thank you for the nice display. You are creators of beauty. You make beauty and beauty does good for the soul. Beauty brings us closer to God. Behind this show of beauty, there are so many hours of training. Continue forward, continue. And thank you.”

    http://www.romereports.com/2016/01/...s-forgive-each-other-during-the-year-of-mercy
     
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  13. Glenn

    Glenn Guest

  14. fallen saint

    fallen saint Baby steps :)

    Humble Soul :)
     
  15. Glenn

    Glenn Guest

    Giving to the poor is part of jubilee year, pope says
    By Cindy Wooden Catholic News Service

    2.10.2016 9:06 AM ET
    VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- A jubilee year that does not open people's wallets to share what they have with others is not a true jubilee, Pope Francis said.

    "This pope isn't inventing that," he insisted. "It's in the Bible."

    At his weekly general audience Feb. 10 in St. Peter's Square, Pope Francis spoke about the description of a jubilee year in the Book of Leviticus. The religious feast also had serious social implications, he said, because it proclaimed a forgiveness of debts, the freedom of indentured servants and special generosity toward the poor and the stranger.

    "It was a kind of 'general amnesty,' which permitted everyone to return to their original situation with the cancellation of every debt, the restitution of land and the possibility of enjoying once again the freedom proper to members of the people of God," he said.

    For God's chosen people, who are called to holiness, the pope said, the jubilee prescriptions help "to combat poverty and inequality, guaranteeing a dignified life for all and a fair distribution of the land on which to live and draw sustenance."

    During the Catholic Church's jubilee year, each Christian should think about what they have, he said, and "if they have too many things," they should "give some to someone who has nothing; 10 percent or 50 percent. The Holy Spirit will inspire you."

    Pope Francis told the crowd gathered in St. Peter's Square that "a jubilee is for conversion so that our hearts become bigger, more generous, more (like) a child of God, with more love."

    "I'll tell you something," he said, "if this jubilee doesn't reach our pockets, it's not a real jubilee. Do you understand? This is in the Bible, eh, this pope isn't inventing that. It's in the Bible."

    "The biblical message is very clear: courageously open yourselves to sharing; this is mercy," the pope said. "If we want mercy from God, let us begin by being merciful ourselves."

    A biblical jubilee is about sharing and solidarity, Pope Francis said. "The biblical jubilee was a 'jubilee of mercy' because it was lived with a sincere search of the good of one's needy brothers and sisters."

    The laws governing God's people in the Bible, he said, also had other means for encouraging people to help others experience God's mercy. One of those things was the command to tithe a tenth of one's earnings to the temple and to widows and orphans or to give a portion of the first fruits of one's harvest.

    In addition, he said, the Bible had harsh words for those who charged high interest rates when loaning to the poor. In many countries, he added, usury is still a huge problem and families lose everything and end up on the streets.

    "Please, let us pray that in this jubilee the Lord would remove from all our hearts this desire to have more," he said.
     
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  16. Glenn

    Glenn Guest



    A brotherly embrace brings pope and Russian patriarch together
    Posted on February 12, 2016


    https://cnstopstories.com/2016/02/12/a-brotherly-embrace-brings-pope-and-russian-patriarch-together/

    Posted on February 12, 2016 by Administrator1
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    Russian Orthodox Patriarch Kirill of Moscow greets Pope Francis at Jose Marti International Airport in Havana Feb. 12. The pope was traveling to Mexico for a six-day pastoral visit. (CNS/Paul Haring)

    By Cindy Wooden
    Catholic News Service

    HAVANA (CNS) — At long last, Pope Francis and Russian Orthodox Patriarch Kirill of Moscow embraced, kissing each other three times.

    “Finally,” the pope told the patriarch Feb. 12 as they met in a lounge at Havana’s Jose Marti International Airport. “We are brothers,” he told the patriarch.

    Amid the clicking of cameras and multiple flashes, Patriarch Kirill was overheard telling the pope, “Things are easier now.”

    “It is clearer that this is God’s will,” Pope Francis told him.

    A flight of almost 12 hours capped months of intense negotiations and more than two decades of Vatican overtures to bring a pope and a Russian patriarch together for the first time.

    Cuban President Raul Castro played host to the pope and patriarch, who was on a visit to Russian Orthodox communities on the island-nation. Pope Francis had a pastoral visit to Mexico planned for months; the stop in Havana was announced only a week before the meeting.

    The addition of a stopover in Cuba was widely seen as a sign of Pope Francis’ willingness to go the extra mile to reach out a hand in friendship. At the same time, observers said, it gave those Russian Orthodox opposed to ecumenism a sense that their church is special and that it bowed to no one in agreeing to the meeting.

    In a commentary distributed Feb. 11, Ukrainian Catholic Bishop Borys Gudziak of Paris said: “The pope is demonstrating humility; he is going to the territory of the other. In the eyes of nostalgic Russians, Cuba is almost home territory, a last outpost of a lost Soviet Empire.”

    For decades, the Russian Orthodox told the Vatican that a meeting between the patriarch and pope was impossible because of the activities of Latin-rite Catholics in Russia and, especially, the Eastern-rite Catholics in Ukraine.

    The Moscow Patriarchate had said that while those problems still exist with the Catholic communities, they take a backseat to the urgency of defending together the rights and very existence of persecuted Christians in the Middle East.

    The harsh persecution of Christians and other minorities in Syria, Iraq and other parts of the region has been a cause Pope Francis has pleaded before world leaders and for which he has rallied the prayers of Christians across the globe.

    He speaks often of the “ecumenism of blood,” the fact that Christians are killed for believing in Christ with the persecutors not knowing or caring what denomination or church they belong to. Christians are fully united in that suffering and, the pope has said, those who die for their faith are in full communion with each other and with centuries of martyrs now in the presence of God.

    But the fate of persecuted Christians was not the pope’s primary motive for meeting Patriarch Kirill. Simply meeting him was the point.

    Metropolitan Hilarion Volokolamsk, head of the Moscow Patriarchate’s external affairs department, told reporters a week earlier that Patriarch Kirill chose Havana in the “New World” because Europe, the “Old World,” was the birthplace of Christian division.

    Ukrainians, Catholic or not, have expressed concerns about Pope Francis’ meeting with Patriarch Kirill given the patriarch’s apparently close ties to Russian President Vladimir Putin at a time of ongoing fighting in Eastern Ukraine.

    “The topics of discussion will not be explicitly political ones,” Bishop Gudziak wrote. “The gist of the rendezvous will be the encounter of church leaders representing very different experiences, agendas, styles and spiritualities of ecclesial leadership. One can hardly expect revolutionary results. Yet, it is through encounter that spiritual change occurs. Let us pray for good spiritual fruit.”
     
  17. Glenn

    Glenn Guest

  18. Glenn

    Glenn Guest

    The Pope calls Mexican bishops to face the challenges of migration and drug trafficking - With prophetic courage

    2016-02-15 L’Osservatore Romano

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    “Only a Church able to shelter the faces of men and women who knock on her doors will be able to speak to them of God.... We do not need 'princes', but rather a community of the Lord’s witnesses.” Pope Francis addressed a long and passionate speech to the bishops of Mexico on Saturday morning, 13 February, in the Cathedral of the Assumption in Mexico City. It was an address in which the Pontiff touched on the serious challenges which the country is facing, including migration and crime. Expressing his trust in the ability of the country and of the Church to walk on the path of peace and justice, the Pope said that he “is sure that Mexico and its Church”, he said, “will make it in time to that rendezvous with themselves, with history and with God”.

    The Pope's address to the bishops

    http://www.news.va/en/news/the-pope-calls-mexican-bishops-to-face-the-challen
     
  19. Mark1

    Mark1 Angels

    ...I support the pope, but am admittedly disappointed that he would call anyone who supports a border wall, "unchristian". In fact, it offends me. I would remind him that unless he can guarantee no one will cross the border who has evil plans, either as a criminal or terrorist, such statements are too broad. Perhaps the Pope would ask me, "Would Christ build a wall?" To which I'd answer, "Would Christ have put on a uniform to go fight the Nazis?" My point is, we are all supposed to have one foot planted on earth, but the other firmly planted in Heaven. Yet, there "are" certain unpleasant realities we must face. Coming up with the proper balance is a very tough thing. I support a wall, because I believe it's chaos along the border, no matter what the proportion of desperate people vs criminals and potential terrorists. Let's forget the wall for a minute. Would the pope have us leave our doors unlocked in case desperate people want to seek shelter, lest we be "unchristian"?
     
  20. Dolours

    Dolours Powers

    I support the pope because he is the Pope. It would be nice if, occasionally, he wouldn't leave us Catholics thinking that we're all doomed while the only people on the path to Heaven are kind hearted atheists and illegal immigrants.

    Here in Ireland we can't house our own homeless yet we are expected to take in thousands of immigrants and eventually all their families, not to mention the strain on our health, welfare and education budgets, and we've only just emerged from the clutches of the IMF, leaving us with huge debts that we will be repaying for generations to come.

    I wish that the Pope would get his information from sources other than scanning one newspaper and the filter of his Secretary of State. I also wish that he would stop giving these post-trip interviews. It's hard enough being a Catholic these days. It has occurred to me more than once that with a Pope like this, who needs enemies. He must know by now that his statements will be twisted by his friends in the media. We'll just have to pray harder for him, for ourselves and for the world.
     
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