Is the language of Ecclesial Latin a Sacramental?

Discussion in 'Questions and Answers' started by RosaryWielder, May 16, 2020.

  1. RosaryWielder

    RosaryWielder Archangels

    I love Ecclesial Latin and believe it's a Holy Language, just like Greek, Aramaic, etc. But when I hear people defend Latin, it seems somewhat disorganized, like there's a bunch of evidence for the sacredness of Latin, but that evidence isn't drawn together into a good argument. If I could take my understanding of all that I've heard about the sacredness of Latin, would it be right to say that Ecclesial Latin is a Sacramental?

    Fr. Chad Ripperger argued that just as a Sacrament is an outward sign of an inward grace instituted by Jesus Christ, so too is a Sacramental an outward sign of an inward grace instituted by the Church. Would the case be made than, that because Latin is liturgical language; and because the pre-modern Saints prayed and wrote in Latin; and because Latin, Greek and Hebrew or Aramaic writing was nailed to the Cross at the Crucifixion; Latin thus becomes a Sacramental?
     
  2. AED

    AED Powers

    I think liturgical Latin is very powerful. Very powerful. I think it is Jesse Romero who recounts assisting at an exorcism where the priest finally began the Hail Mary in Latin after nothing else had worked. And at that moment the demons fled.
     
  3. RosaryWielder

    RosaryWielder Archangels

    Can some kind of Theological argument be made for efficaciousness of Latin in prayer?
     
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  4. josephite

    josephite Powers

    I wish I knew Latin.
    I think as a child I was getting an understanding of Latin but then that understanding halted when Mass was said in English. And it faded in my memory.
    I'm trying to relearn it but it's hard when you don't hear it often. When I say a prayer in Latin, like the Ave Maria, it takes me a longer time to pray and I think I get the pronunciation wrong at times
    The introduction of some prayers in Latin being brought back to our Masses over the last 5 or 6 years, has been edifying. I love the idea that all Catholics throughout the world speak the same language and no matter where you are in the world you would understand the mass, and Latin is a beautiful and Holy Language, however I also like hearing Mass offered in my native English as well.

    English ...................................................... Latin

    Hail Mary........................................ Ave Maria

    Hail Mary, ...................................................Ave Maria,
    Full of Grace,............................................... Gratia plena,
    The Lord is with thee. .................................Dominus tecum.
    Blessed art thou among women, ................ Benedicta tu in mulieribus,
    and blessed is the fruit................................ Et Benedictus fructus
    of thy womb, Jesus. ................................... . Ventris tui, Iesus.


    Holy Mary,................................................... Sancta Maria,
    Mother of God, ............................................Mater Dei,
    pray for us sinners now, ..............................Ora pro nobis peccatoribus,
    and at the hour of our death. ..................... Nunc et in hora mortis nostrae.

    Amen. ......................................................... Amen.
     
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  5. padraig

    padraig New Member

    [​IMG]

     
    Last edited: May 17, 2020
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  6. RosaryWielder

    RosaryWielder Archangels

    Actually, someone gave me this quote from Pope St. John XXIII:

    Finally, the Catholic Church has a dignity far surpassing that of every merely human society, for it was founded by Christ the Lord. It is altogether fitting, therefore, that the language it uses should be noble, majestic, and non-vernacular.

    In addition, the Latin language “can be called truly catholic.”10 It has been consecrated through constant use by the Apostolic See, the mother and teacher of all Churches, and must be esteemed “a treasure … of incomparable worth.”11. It is a general passport to the proper understanding of the Christian writers of antiquity and the documents of the Church’s teaching.12 It is also a most effective bond, binding the Church of today with that of the past and of the future in wonderful continuity.


    -Pope St. John XXIII https://www.papalencyclicals.net/John23/j23veterum.htm (Emphasis mine)

    Also I'd argue that, because of the Anglican Ordiniate, the Early Modern English of the Anglican prayers and the Douay-Rheims Bible, has become Sacramental, just like how I would argue that the liturgical languages of Armenian and Old Church Slavonic are also sacramental. I'm pretty sure most of us already say our prayers in Early Modern English, as opposed to contemporary English, so perhaps that itself is a form of sensus fidelium.
     
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  7. padraig

    padraig New Member

    Yes it reminds me of Churches.
    I notice older Churches get holier and holier a bit like a good wine.

    Hopefully people should be the same, getting holier and holier as they get on in years.

    I hate to meet a bad older person.
     
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  8. AED

    AED Powers

    I read somewhere that in old age we are what we always were only more so. I think that may be somewhat true especially if there is no faith.
     
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  9. padraig

    padraig New Member

    I read somewhere that we become what we most hope for. So if the one thing we most hope for is to be holy, that is what we become.

    That our hearts lead us on. We follow our dreams.

    [​IMG]
     
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